Semester 2 – mandatory courses for undergraduate students

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PLEASE READ BEFORE CONTINUING

 

First, select your mandatory courses, then select your options – click here.

First, fill your learning agreement, then wait for the online registration link by email.

 

MANDATORY COURSES – assessed by continuous assessment (no retake)

 

1) FRENCH LANGUAGE COURSE: Mandatory for tracks 1, 2 or 3 – 5 ECTS per module – Bachelor year 3 level

Course code: FLES1

C1 and above are exempted from this class and should select another one to replace it (CF or CS in French)

Track 1: French Language (>Syllabus 1, >Syllabus 2)

Track 2: Français pour les sciences sociales (>Syllabus)

Track 3: Français sur objectif universitaire (>Syllabus)

 

Seminar: 2 hours a week.   The program will vary according to the teacher and the level.

You will be assigned a group on Tuesday or Thursday afternoon according to your level. It will not clash with the CS or Multisport slots.  See here for important information

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2) FEIS: Mandatory for tracks 1, 2 or 3 – 5 ECTS per module – Bachelor year 3 level

FEIS taught in English: syllabus

FEIS taught in French: syllabus

Course code: FEISS2 France, Etat, Institutions, Société – Wednesday 8-10 OR 10.15-12.15 (you will be placed in a group)

If you are staying for a year, you will only study FEIS in semester 1

Seminar:  – 2 hours a week

The program will vary according to the teacher and the level.

A1, A2, B1.1 students will study this course in English, otherwise it is taught in French.
Examples of subjects taught in the class:

  • History of France (for example WW1, Vichy, resistance movements, Algerian war)
  • The foundation of the Nation State, the Republic (5 Republics), symbols
  • Semi presidential regime + elections
  • Foreign policy
  • Human rights, social welfare…
  • Institutions
  • Territorial policy, centralisation/decentralisation + reform
  • Fundamental principles (secular state…)

 

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3) CMINT: Mandatory for tracks 1 & 2 Seminar in English for international students – 5 ECTS per module – Bachelor year 3 level

Course code: CMINT

ONLY one CMINT per semester. 

Certain CMINT are repeated S1 then S2. 

You will be assigned a group (we will try to respect the choice on your learning agreement, depending on student numbers).

2 hours a week

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CMINT S2 Comparative regionalism – Wednesday 10.15-12.15

Fabien Terpan (>Syllabus, pdf)

Regional integration has become an important feature of world politics since the mid-1980s and the explosion of various forms of regional organisations on a global scale. While the European Union appears to be one of the most integrated form of organization, regional integration is a worldwide phenomenon with many examples in Africa (ECOWAS, SADC), Asia (ASEAN, SAARC, Shangaï Cooperation Organization) and Latin America (MERCOSUR, Pacific Alliance, CARICOM).

The aim of this course is to understand the dynamics of regionalization, the rise of regions but also their vulnerability or disintegration, by comparing their institutional and normative features (concentration of powers, delegation of competences, sources of law, enforcement mechanisms, citizens representation and participation…), and their embeddedness in global politics.  

 
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Change in Global Politics – Monday 15.15-17.15 

Mayeul Kauffmann (> Syllabus, pdf

The course addresses key aspects of change in structures and processes, as well as in issues of international and global nature. It focuses on the variety of actors and highlights how diverse their strategies and repertoires of actions can be. The study of the latter will include not only acts of commission (doing), but also acts of omission and of expression; all of them illustrating ways to cooperate or not cooperate among actors of change in global politics, in coercive or persuasive manners.

A significant part of the course time will be devoted to the study of specific cases, including the methodology of applied research in this field, through participating in a real research project, which is likely to  be published. Considerable time will be spent doing online research and analysis.  Aspects of  theoretical background will mainly be covered through required readings selected to enable students to make up for any missing knowledge compared with older students in the group, thanks to self-study (some class time will be devoted to answering questions related to the readings).

 
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CMINT S2 Foreign policy – Monday 15.15-17.15 

Livia Perosino (> Syllabus, pdf)

Contemporary politics and international relations are changing, conflicts take different shapes, and media coverage has evolved radically with the rise of immediate means of communication and social media. The importance of the virtual world has also changed our sense of value, and processes of capital accumulation. The role of states and the sense of sovereignty have also changed, with the income of some private companies being higher than the GDP of entire countries. What is the role of resources and of States in contemporary international relations? Are resources at the heart of conflict, at a time in which national boundaries seem increasingly blurry?
By keeping a constant and critical eye on the news from all horizons and by analysing certain topics in depth, the class will aim at improving the critical capacities of the students through debating with their peers, enriching each other visions and sources of information.

 
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CMINT S2 Foreign policy  ONLINE ONLY, BY ZOOM (this seminar is part of our virtual campus bringing together students from all French IEPs)  begins in March for 9 sessions

9 sessions, 2h per week Monday 10.15-12.15

Livia Perosino (> Syllabus, pdf)

Contemporary politics and international relations are changing, conflicts take different shapes, and media coverage has evolved radically with the rise of immediate means of communication and social media. The importance of the virtual world has also changed our sense of value, and processes of capital accumulation. The role of states and the sense of sovereignty have also changed, with the income of some private companies being higher than the GDP of entire countries. What is the role of resources and of States in contemporary international relations? Are resources at the heart of conflict, at a time in which national boundaries seem increasingly blurry?
By keeping a constant and critical eye on the news from all horizons and by analysing certain topics in depth, the class will aim at improving the critical capacities of the students through debating with their peers, enriching each other visions and sources of information.

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CMINT S2 International Policy Lab  – Friday 8-10  (only 10 places available)

Vincent Caby (> Syllabus, pdf)

The objective of this course is twofold:

– Firstly, the course aims to provide students with the basic working methods necessary for training in political science and social sciences. How to read and discuss a scientific paper? How to search for, collect, organize and analyze various information sources. How to apply political science and social sciences theories and concepts.

– Secondly, the Policy Lab introduces the sociology of public problems and public policy analysis. The full list of concepts and methods that students should master at the end of the course can be found in the columns “Concepts and Methods” of the “Course agenda” section. The course will answer the following questions: Which specific steps do troubling conditions have to go through to become a public problem? How and why does attention to public problems rise and fall? How to identify and map claims, claimsmakers and coalitions? The ultimate goal is to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills for critically thinking about and responding to public problem claims in the media and the public sphere.

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S2 « Policy Lab-European Union », 5 ECTS

CMINT S2  Policy Lab 3 – European Union – Tuesday 13-15 

Christophe Bouillaud (> Syllabus, pdf)

 The Policy Lab 3 – European Union will articulate two lines of inquiry :

 –  a reminder of the basic facts, helping to understand what actually is the European Union, what it does (and does not do), why and how (institutional history; main classical theories of European integration [neo-fonctionalism, liberal intergovernmentalism, federalism, etc.]; main European policies [Common Agricultural Policy, Single Market, Monetary Union, etc.]).

 – a special focus on the looming June 2024 European Elections. The policy lab will monitor, at both European and national levels, on a weekly basis the electoral campaign during the late Winter 2024 and early Spring 2024 (protagonists, issues, events), aiming to introduce students to present European political life.

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CMINT S2 Crime and Security, ONLINE ONLY, BY ZOOM (this seminar is part of our virtual campus bringing together students from all French IEPs)

9 sessions, 2h per week Monday 13.00-15.00 

François BONNET (>Syllabus, pdf)    

Crime and security is a general course in ‘punishment and society’ studies, which discusses large-scale issues (penal paradigms, historical developments in crime control, explanations for the variation of punishment in time and space), different sorts of crime (from homicides to burglaries and drug trafficking, sex work, domestic violence and employee theft), and crime control policies (policing, prisons, situational crime prevention).

The course will discuss theories, concepts and controversies with an emphasis on existing policies and empirical data. It will mobilize readings from different disciplines (sociology, economics, history, criminology) and using different methods (ethnography, econometrics, meta-analysis), so as to maximize the intellectual benefit for students who are enthusiastic about learning.

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4) CM: Mandatory for track 3 :  Conférences de méthode en français – 5 ECTS per module – Bachelor year 1 or 3 levels

Course code: CM1S2 or CM3S2

UNE SEULE par semestre.
Vous pourrez choisir votre groupe lors de l’inscription pédagogique (places limitées par groupe).

2 hours a week

Les Conférences de Méthode (CM) sont des espaces où les étudiant-e-s présentent des exposés, animent des débats, participent à des discussions (« Soft Skills ») en s’appuyant sur des connaissances scientifiques, des dossiers et des bibliographies (« Hard Skills ») fournies par les équipes pédagogiques.

 

 

CM1S2 Méthodes des sciences sociales (CM de 1ère année – difficile mais plus facile qu’une CM de 3e année)

Example syllabus (there are several professors and each has their own syllabus)

L’analyse de l’information chiffrée, comme celle des discours produits par les acteurs (citoyens, usagers, consommateurs…), se rencontrent aujourd’hui à tous les stades des processus d’expertise et de décision.
Savoir construire ou utiliser des données d’enquête pour expliquer les comportements et les opinions des individus représente ainsi une compétence forte, valorisable auprès des employeurs privés comme publics.
Les sciences sociales (économie, histoire, marketing, science politique, sociologie) partagent un corpus de méthodes, dans lequel on distingue classiquement les enquêtes quantitatives (enquête par questionnaire à domicile, postal, téléphonique, online) des enquêtes qualitatives (entretien individuel, focus group, observation ethnographique).
La conférence a un double objectif : faire comprendre aux étudiants les différences et la complémentarité entre ces méthodes ; leur permettre d’appréhender par la pratique l’analyse statistique des données quantitatives et l’analyse des entretiens semi-directifs.

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CM3S2 Politique internationale et comparée (CM de 3e année – plus difficile qu’une CM de 1e année)

Example syllabus (there are several professors and each has their own syllabus)

Cette conférence de méthode porte sur les relations (ou affaires) internationales et la politique comparée (global politics). Elle vise à former les étudiants sur les principaux acteurs, enjeux et dynamiques de la vie internationale. Seront en particulier abordés les types de régimes politiques, les dynamiques de coopération interétatiques et transnationales (en particulier via les organisations internationales au sens large), les formes de conflictualité ainsi que les négociations et relations diplomatiques. Cette conférence mobilisera l’ensemble des connaissances accumulées sur ces questions et des réflexions sur les principaux événements contemporains.  Les compétences acquises par les étudiants leur permettront de porter un regard global sur les problèmes politiques à travers le monde. En outre, la conférence est conseillée à tous ceux qui souhaitent s’orienter vers des métiers qui s’inscrivent dans une dimension internationale.

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