International tracks

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International tracks for international students     2017-18

The track that you are placed in depends on your level of French (certified by you on registration).

5 ECTS per course, 35 ECTS maximum per student per semester

30 ECTS = CEPSS/COPS certificate *

 

There are 4 tracks, and each has 2/3 obligatory classes and several options.

 

TRACK 1: English track for international students with A1/A2 or B1.1 French

OBLIGATORY

1/ Seminar: French language class (FLE)

2/ Seminar: France, state, institutions and society (civi) 1 semester only – taught in English

3/ Seminar on an international/comparative politics theme – taught in English

 

TRACK 2: Mixed track for international students with B1.2 or B2.1 French

OBLIGATORY

1/ Seminar: Français pour les sciences sociales (FLE) – French language class

2/ Seminar: France, Etat, institutions et société (civi) 1 semester only – taught in French

3/ Seminar on an international/comparative politics theme

 

 

TRACK 3: French Track for international students with B2/C1 French

OBLIGATORY

1/ Seminar: Français sur objectifs universitaires (FLE) – French language class

2/ Seminar: France, Etat, institutions, société (civi) 1 semester only – taught in French

3/ Seminar:

S1 Politiques publiques en Europe – taught in French

S2 Politique internationale et comparée – taught in French

 

TRACK 4: Francophone Track for international students with C2 French/native speakers

OBLIGATORY

1/ Seminar S1: CM Sociologie Politique et CM Politiques publiques en Europe

2/ Seminar S2: CM Méthodes des sciences sociales et  CM Politique internationale et comparée

 

OPTIONS FOR ALL TRACKS

OPTIONS

1/ Lecture CF – free choice – taught in French (for tracks 2, 3, 4)

2/ Lecture CS – free choice – taught in English (for track 1) taught in French or English (for tracks 2, 3, 4)

 

3/ Foreign language – only 1 per semester – no beginner classes

English B1 or B2 or C1

German B1 or B2 or C1

Spanish B1 or B2 or C1

Italian B1 or B2 or C1

 

4/ Sports class – free choice, including multisports class (mountain biking/climbing, Nordic skiing, snowboarding…) on Monday and Tuesday from 7.30 am to 12.45 pm) –  only 1 per semester

http://www.sciencespo-grenoble.fr/vie-etudiante/la-vie-sportive/decouvrir-et-sinscrire-au-sport/

 

5/ UGA partner university class 

The UGA website gives an idea of the degrees on offer there, but for information on specific courses open to international students, you will need to visit the faculty international relations departments at the beginning of the semester (Science, Social Science, Languages) to obtain a list of their available courses.

 

* CEPSS – Certificat d’Etudes Politiques et Sciences Sociales, COPS Certificate of Political Studies

NB If you are staying 1 year, your « civi » class may be placed in S2

NB Your learning agreement.  Our available courses may change before the September/January semesters. Don’t worry: You will be able to make modifications to your learning agreement in October and February when you are sure of what you will be studying.  Your study abroad officer will be flexible on this point.

 

 

Here are some examples of seminars in the English and Mixed tracks: subject to modification.

 

You will be placed in a group by our administration in September


SEMESTER 1
Change in global politics
Political participation in a comparative perspective
European public health and risk issues
SEMESTER 2
Change in global politics
Law and social sciences


 

Seminar : Change in Global Politics

Prof. Franck Petiteville, Professor in Political Science and International Relations,

After recalling the core hypothesis of mainstream international theories (realism, liberalism, transnationalism, constructivism), this course aims to underline the dynamics of change in contemporary global politics by raising the following questions: what is the nature of state power in an era of globalization? Is sovereignty an obsolete or a resilient norm? How has diplomacy evolved over time? What are the functions of the international organizations? How has war been transformed from the 20th century World Wars to contemporary armed conflicts? Can we judge the legitimacy of armed violence according to the “just war doctrine”? What is the record of half a century of UN peacekeeping? Are international sanctions a new way of managing conflicts? What is the specificity of global terrorism as a form of political violence? Is the danger of nuclear proliferation under control? Can the international community protect human rights? How does international criminal justice work? How are international migrations regulated? How are environmental challenges managed by the international community?

 

Seminar : Political Participation in Comparative Perspective

Prof. Dr. Sonja Zmerli, Professor in Political Science

Political participation is considered to be the corner stone of democratic societies. And yet the interrelationship between the legitimacy of political rule and the “universe” of political participation is complex. While high turnout levels at national elections, for example, are an essential ingredient of legitimizing governments and their policies, non-institutionalized forms of participation, such as protest activities or boycotts, may be perceived as a threat to incumbent political parties or even the democratic regime as a whole. Different schools of thoughts have developed different views on the necessity and legitimacy of political participation and help to address the challenges that different types of political action seemingly represent.

Departing from a theoretically grounded understanding of political participation in democratic societies, this seminar is concerned with investigating the subject matter in a structured and comparative manner. We will be investigating different forms of political action, their individual and contextual determinants and political and societal implications. A comparative approach to levels and trends of political action in European societies will serve as a baseline to discuss common causes and consequences and their differences respectively.

Seminar : Law and Social Sciences

Amélie Imbert, lecturer in Legal History,

Laurence Dumoulin, CNRS Researcher in Political Science

Indeed, can law be understood as merely a legal subject? Is it made only by and for trained legal people or can other scholars handle legal issues? In this seminar, we plan to analyse legal phenomena, legal rules and legal practice from an interdisciplinary perspective. There is no doubt that theory and philosophy of law, history, anthropology, sociology and political science can significantly help us understand what is at stake in legal issues: what law does to society and what society does to and with the law?

This perspective will lead us to handle key issues and to explore an array of topics such as: Law, state and violence; Legal cultures and cultures of legality; Law & gender; Lawyers and legal professions; Trial and sentencing; Law, Politics and Judicialization…

This course is an interactive one: it aims to be a discussion class based on both the students’ presentations and input and the teachers’ feedback. Each time it is possible to do so, multimedia sources (movies, documentary, TV shows) will be focused on to illustrate the theoretical and empirical notions of the course.

Seminar : European public health and risk issues

Céline Granjou IRSTEA Researcher in Political Science

This course aims to present European policies approach to health and food risks since the 1990s. The class revolves around notions and debates on health risks and how they have been addressed in social sciences. Drawing on the case of the mad cow crisis in Europe, the class will retrace the reform of health risk assessment and the creation of new independent risk agencies (such as the Anses in France). The class will focus on the adoption of new principles regarding transparency, communication of scientific uncertainties and the rise of the precautionary principle and their significance for democracy.

Starting with the presentation of a range of industrial, technological disasters and health and food scandals since the 1970s, this course will study the notion of risk society and how political sciences and political sociology have invested issues of risks through research committed to fostering technical democracy. Drawing on the case of the mad cow crisis in France and Europe, the course will then examine the re-organization of expert assessment and communication of health risks at stake in this seminal affair and its major consequences in the shift to more transparent and participative assessment and management of health and food risks. In so doing, the course will also give methodological insights into how to design, carry out and exploit an empirical investigation on health risk assessment and management.


Your learning agreement.  Our available courses may change before the September/January semesters. Don’t worry: You will be able to make modifications to your learning agreement in October and February when you are sure of what you will be studying.  Your study abroad officer will be flexible on this point.